Cloud Video Surveillance Report 2014

Dean Drako
President and CEO, Eagle Eye Networks

Introduction


Eagle Eye Networks’ 1st annual Video Surveillance survey report compiles multiple independent, blind/anonymous surveys regarding on business use of surveillance systems, including cloud video surveillance.

Information Technology (IT) and Video Surveillance professionals and management responded to multiple surveys executed over the time period from late 2013 through April 2014. The survey questions were run by an outside firm and the number of participants ranged from 250 to 500 respondents. By analyzing this comprehensive feedback, we can better understand key trends for this business and technology area.

Table of Contents


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1. Survey methodology and demographics
1.1 Methodology
1.2 Job Function

2. Business Plans for Video Surveillance
2.1 Video Surveillance usage plans: Protection versus Operations Improvement
2.2 Video Surveillance Operations Improvement Analytics Expected to be Deployed

3. Cloud Video Surveillance
3.1 Video Recording Location Preference: On-premise versus the Cloud
3.2 Top Drivers for Cloud-managed Video Surveillance
3.3 Top Hurdles to Cloud-managed Video Surveillance System Deployment
3.4 Top Frustrations with Current Video Surveillance Systems

4. Information Technology (IT) Role in Video Surveillance
4.1 Percentage of IT Professionals now Involved in Video Surveillance
4.2 IT Specific Role in Video Surveillance
4.3 Video Surveillance System Vulnerability to Cyber Attack

5. Summary

1. Survey methodology and demographics


1.1 Survey Methodology

From 250 to 500 Information Technology (IT), Video Surveillance professionals and managers participated in multiple online surveys executed in March and April 2014. By analyzing this comprehensive feedback, we can better understand key business and technology trends.

The geographical area covered was the United States.

1.2 Respondent Job Functions

The typical job functions of the respondents were 29 percent in management of any function, 28 percent in Information Technology, 28 percent in Security or Operations (16 percent and 12 percent, respectively), and 10 percent Resellers and Installers.

survey-respondent-job-function-chart

2. Business Plans for Video Surveillance


500 survey respondents participated in the business plans survey questions.

2.1 Video Surveillance Usage Plans: Protection versus Operations Improvement

To determine business objectives without limitation based on current video surveillance system functionality, survey participants were asked what their business’ video surveillance system usage plans were following their next system purchase or upgrade.

68 percent are planning to have their video surveillance systems usage include business operations improvement. That number is more than twice as many than plan to continue using video surveillance exclusively for protection purposes.

In the following question, we look at what specific areas of operations improvement they plan to target.

future-video-surveillance-plans-chart

2.2 Video Surveillance Operations Improvement Analytics Expected to be Deployed

The participants ranked their primary targets for operations improvement using video surveillance within two years, other than security/protection. The top tier business focus areas selected were “improving sales or customer service”, at 51 percent, and “managing general employee productivity” at 44 percent.

The second tier plans were “analyzing customer behavior and patterns”, and “reducing injury”, at 32 and 30 percent, respectively.

Respondents could select two choices, so the combined results total to more than 100 percent.

video-surveillance-operations-analytics

3. Cloud Video Surveillance


250 survey respondents participated in the following survey questions, which were also asked to a general audience of IT, Video Surveillance professionals and management. In cases where respondents could select two choices, the combined results will total to more than 100 percent.

3.1 Video Recording Location Preference: On-premise versus the Cloud

Survey participants ranked their company’s ideal preference for the location of their video recording.

Approximately two-thirds (65 percent) wanted at least some cloud video recording. Only 35 percent exclusively preferred on-premise (on-site) video recording.

The largest group, 44 percent, wanted to deploy a mix of both cloud and on-premise recording.

video-recording-location-preference

3.2. Top Drivers for Cloud-managed Video Surveillance

75 percent of IT and video surveillance professionals saw some advantages for cloud-managed video surveillance systems; only 25 percent saw no advantages.

For those that saw advantages for cloud-managed video surveillance system, the top advantage cited was “flexible storage capacity and off-site redundancy”, at 39 percent.

The second driver was a tie between “easier access to video content and camera status” and “easier multi-site integration and upgrades”. The third tier drivers were camera deployment and the reduced upfront costs and support.

Cloud-Video-Surveillance-Drivers-Survey

3.3 Hurdles to Cloud-managed Video Surveillance System Deployment

79 percent saw at least one hurdle to cloud-managed video surveillance. The top two hurdles cited were cloud security, at 45 percent, and high bandwidth usage, at 41 percent. The second tier concerns were system reliability, the expected transition effort, and incompatibility with existing cameras.

hurdles-to-deployment

3.4 Top Frustrations with Current Video Surveillance Systems

A slight majority, or 54 percent, cited some dissatisfaction with their current video surveillance system. At 39 percent, the top complaint was poor image quality. The other frustrations were fairly evenly divided. Multi-site issues/camera/browser incompatibility was 28 percent. Limited or difficulty in accessing the video content was 27 percent.

Lack of system reliability and/or not knowing that the system wasn’t functioning was 26 percent and outgrowing the system and/or the technology becoming outdated was 26 percent.

frustrations-with-current-video-systems

4. Information Technology (IT) Role in Video Surveillance


500 survey respondents participated in the 2-part IT role survey questions.

4.1 Portion of IT Professionals Involved in Video Surveillance

As of April 2014, 58 percent of Information Technology (IT) professionals are now involved in Video Surveillance in some way. This grew from 49 percent of IT professionals that said they were involved in video surveillance six months ago, in October 2013 (368 respondents). It is unclear whether incidents with the HeartBleed vulnerability and open ports to video surveillance system have been factors in the increase.

In the following question, we look at what specific roles IT plays in video surveillance.

it-professionals-involved-video

4.2 IT Specific Role(s) in Video Surveillance

For those businesses where the Information Technology group had a role in video surveillance, the most commonly cited role was network and server installation and support, at 44%.

IT’s role also expanded well beyond installation and support, with close to one third involved with each of: Security; Storage management; System and camera selection, and video data analytics and operations.

it-specific-roles-video

4.3 Video Surveillance System Vulnerability to Cyber Attack

About 7 out of 10 of the 250 IT professionals surveyed believed video surveillance systems were vulnerable to cyber-attack. That is almost 5X the number who felt the systems were not vulnerable.

it-professional-assessment-vulnerability

5. Summary


The key findings of this report are summarized below.

Business Plans for Video Surveillance

  • 68 percent of the 500 respondents surveyed on their video surveillance systems usage plans indicated they were targeting using surveillance for business operations improvement. That number is more than twice as many than plan to continue using video surveillance exclusively for protection purposes.
  • The respondents ranked their primary targets for operations improvement using video surveillance within two years, other than security/protection. The top tier business focus areas selected were improving sales/customer service and managing general employee productivity. The second tier plans were analyzing customer behavior/patterns, reducing injury, and compliance with processes/hours.

Cloud Video Surveillance

  • Two thirds of the 250 survey respondents surveyed cited their company’s ideal preference for the location of their video recording wanted at least some cloud video recording. The largest group, 44 percent, wanted a mix of both cloud and on-premise recording. Only 35 percent exclusively prefer on-site video recording.
  • The top advantage of a cloud-managed video surveillance system cited was flexible storage capacity and off-site redundancy. The second driver was a tie between easier access to video content/ camera status and easier multi-site integration/upgrades. The third tier was easier camera deployment and the reduced upfront costs and support.
  • The two primary hurdles to cloud-managed video surveillance system deployment were cloud security and high bandwidth usage.
  • The respondents top frustration with their current video surveillance systems was poor image quality. Other criticisms were fairly evenly divided between multi-site issues/camera/browser incompatibility, limited or difficult access to video content, system unreliability and/or not knowing that the system wasn’t functioning , and outgrowing the system and/or the technology becoming outdated.

Information Technology (IT) Team’s Role in Video Surveillance

  • 58 percent of the 500 video surveillance and Information Technology (IT) professionals responding to the survey indicated that their IT team was involved in video surveillance in some way. IT’s role crossed multiple tasks from network/server installation and support to Security, Storage, System selection and video data analytics and operations.
  • Cyber-attack vulnerability concerns were cited by 7 out of 10 of the 250 IT professionals surveyed, almost 5X the number who felt the systems were not vulnerable.

Dean Drako Bio


President & CEO, Eagle Eye Networks, Inc.

Dean Drako is founder, President and CEO of Eagle Eye Networks, the leading provider of an on-demand security and operations video management system. When Dean launched Eagle Eye Networks in 2014, he was written up in Wall Street Journal, Market Watch, Dow Jones, Computer World, and more than a dozen other publications.

Prior to Eagle Eye, Drako was founder, president and CEO of Barracuda Networks, where he developed the IT security industry’s first spam filter appliance. From Barracuda’s inception in 2003 through 2012, Drako grew the company to be an IT security industry leader, with more than $200 million in annual sales, and 150,000 customers. Barracuda Networks completed their IPO in 2013; Drako continues to serve on its board of directors.

In 2007, Drako won the Ernst and Young Northern California Entrepreneur of the Year for Networking and Communications. In 2014, Dean was selected as keynote speaker for UC Berkeley Engineers Week. Drako did his undergraduate study at University of Michigan in Electrical Engineering, received his Masters in Electrical Engineering from University of California at Berkeley, and holds 27 patents.

Dean Drako is President and CEO of Eagle Eye Networks. Follow him on Google+

About Eagle Eye Networks


Eagle Eye delivers the first on-demand cloud based security and operations video management system (VMS) providing both cloud and on-premise recording, in conjunction with a cloud video API platform. Eagle Eye offers secure, encrypted recording, camera management, mobile viewing and alerts – all from a 100% cloud managed platform. The Eagle Eye Security Camera Video Management System uses Intelligent Bandwidth Management™, making it easy to deploy at single and multiple sites, and supports a broad array of IP and analog cameras. Eagle Eye Networks sells through authorized resellers. The API platform uses time based data structures used for indexing, search, retrieval and analysis of the live and archived video. Eagle Eye Networks sells through authorized reseller and installation partners. The headquarters is at 411 Brazos St, Suite 101, Austin, TX. For more information please visit www.eagleeyenetworks.com or call +1-512-473-0500.